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  1. #1
    Supreme Member
    Mar 2009
    9,003

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    "A film is never really good unless the camera is an eye in the head of a poet" (Orson Welles)

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    Ozu , . , ( ). , . , , Wisejake, . . , , "" ( /slices of life) Ozu.

    Spoiler:

    Pure cinema is cinema of absolute image. The pure cinema can be moments of extreme contemplation without resorting to plot or narrative strategies. Sometimes a film can have the narrative implicated but there are moments when the image "escapes" any possible rationality. Those images maybe are from a poetic understanding of the world that has stripped away many elements that "obscures" the act of watching. So We see things as they are. The tree as a tree, the dog as a dog. It is by achieving an eternal emptiness but at the same time we achieve a deep abstraction of the reality that is in front of us. The image doesnt point to anything else, they are a direct gaze to the universe and time.


    In Ozu you have characters and sadness but his style is highly formalistic. The images convey states of contemplation, looking at the world without any point of view (neither human). Avoiding the point of view is like giving the camera a power of transcending reality. Also pure cinema is in PRESENT tense, like Wisejake affirms, they are moments. But most importantly it is cinema true to life. Life has no plot, it is a totally chaotic world filled with accidents, like the "piecemeal" style of the films of Ozu.



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    CINEMA AS POETRY

    By the term "poetic cinema" I refer primarily to the Poetic or Archaic School in Soviet Cinema of the 1960s and 70s, which originates in the silent films of Alexandr Dovzhenko. The term itself alludes to the Russian formalist distinction between the two "genres" of cinema as poetry and prose, i.e. a cinema built around the symbolic and graphic-rhythmic imaginary and a narrative cinema based on the cause and effect.
    Major filmmakers of the movement:

    Armenian:
    Sergei Parajanov
    Artavazd Peleshian

    Ukrainian:
    Yuri Ilyenko
    Leonid Osyka
    Volodymyr Denysenko
    Mykola Mashchenko
    Ivan Mykolaichuk
    Kira Muratova

    Georgian:
    Tengiz Abuladze
    Otar Iosseliani

    Kyrgyz:
    Bolotbek Shamshiev

    Russian:
    Andrei Tarkovsky
    Aleksandr Sokurov
    Konstantin Lopushansky
    Aleksei German
    POETIC CINEMA

    Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling.

    The passion caused by the great and sublime in nature . . . is Astonishment; and astonishment is that state of the soul, in which all its motions are suspended, with some degree of horror. In this case the mind is so entirely filled with its object, that it cannot entertain any other.


    Edmund Burke (1729–1797). On the Sublime and Beautiful.
    POETIC HORROR AND THE SUBLIME

    CONTEMPLATIVE CINEMA STARTER PACK

    Contemplative Cinema: Classics & Contemporary
    Last edited by Skakinen; 13-04-2019 at 17:06. : layout

  2. #2
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    Mar 2009
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